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Amparo Bertram

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06:25 pm: Grading Party
The English teachers gathered together in a classroom to grade our section of the entrance exam. This was a very thorough process. The eight of us pushed a bunch of desks together and sat in a circle so we could discuss tricky grading nuances. (Does it matter if the capitalization is wrong? How much would you take off for a missing period?) Each problem for each student had to be graded by three different teachers to make sure we caught everything and graded fairly.

I did the two composition questions, which made my job easy, because most students left them blank. (As one of the other teachers commented: "On the one hand, it makes grading much faster, but on the other, it means more work later because the students can't do this yet.") After that, the points had to be tallied separately by three different teachers to make sure there weren't any addition errors. Finally, we had to fill out forms detailing, from a random sample of papers, what percentage of the students got right answers, wrong answers, or left them blank, *and* we had to provide sample wrong answers, all for each question.

This took up most of the morning. It was a rough test. I think the highest grade out of the whole bunch was 76.

The peanut butter cookies were appreciated, though.

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Comments

From:mangaroo
Date:March 10th, 2005 09:44 am (UTC)
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I'm surprised this only took up most of the morning, if every question had to be reviewed by three teachers. How many students took the test? (This is an entrance exam and not a skills assessment? Or does it serve as both?)

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From:spacealien_vamp
Date:March 10th, 2005 01:05 pm (UTC)
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I'm surprised this only took up most of the morning, if every question had to be reviewed by three teachers.

A lot of it was either multiple choice or one-word answers, so it went pretty fast. Plus a lot of the longer answers were just left blank, or had something that was clearly wrong. (For example, for the question "What do you want to do in the future?" a number of students answered "Yes, I do.")

How many students took the test?

I'm not quite sure...maybe around 150 or so?

(This is an entrance exam and not a skills assessment? Or does it serve as both?)

It's an entrance exam, and from what I can tell it's a standard exam given to all students across a wide area, though I have no idea if it's city-wide, prefecture-wide, or nation-wide. Possibly it's a prefectural test. At any rate, it's clear that it wasn't designed by our school, because the teachers were complaining about some of the questions.

It is possible, however, that the students' achievement level on this test will be taken into account when they are divided into high-achievers and low-achievers. So, in that sense, it could be considered a skills assessment.
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